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Guitar Lesson - Shawn Lane - Power Solos (REH Complete)  See details »

 
Video subtitles:
  • 00:00: the incredible guitar style of Sean
  • 01:07: Wayne influenced by rock blues classical and James Sean lanes awesome technique and exceptional musicianship have brought him international attention by fellow guitarist and music fans alike reh and CPP are very proud to present for the first time Sean Lane in this two-part instructional and performance video series in the next hour we'll see Sean perform live and learned about some of his fine compositions also Sean picks up where he left off in volume 1
  • 01:39: discussing playing techniques and his amazing use of pentatonic scales so we hope you enjoy getting to know and learning from this talented musician Sean Lane welcome to my second instructional video
  • 02:36: for reh in this one hopefully I'll be showing some things that weren't covered in the first video also we're going to include some performance footage from a recent concert that I did it musicians Institute out here in Los Angeles right now we're filming from record one studio out in Sherman Oaks Los Angeles area where I'm cutting some tracks for an upcoming release with producer Andy John's the great producers worked with a lot of great people like van Halen Joe Satriani lots of great people and in the mi concert we're going to be seeing me
  • 03:09: play with my full band which includes beibei's on bass Doug Scarborough on keyboards and Shawn Rickman on drums and then also some other footage that was shot in Seattle with me and Sean Rickman on the drums performing with computer tracks that I laid down previously on the keyboard keyboard bass and keyboards accompanying us so hope you enjoy Oh Hey
  • 03:40: you okay now we're going to cover some
  • 04:14: different ways to finger the different pentatonic positions primarily in an ace ending manner this uses some kind of unusual fingering patterns that really make it easier to play groupings and shapes of this type so first I think I should show the basic pentatonic positions in a given key and the way that I break them up in my style of playing so we're going to be in the key of a and I'm going to go slowly through
  • 04:45: the five different pentatonic positions first position the second position is this is all two notes per string third position is here's the fourth position
  • 05:17: position number five starts all over again the next talked about now I want to show you a pentatonic sequence and a method of fingering it that's quite unusual and will be of great help in playing particularly ascending rhythmic groupings of five in the various
  • 05:48: pentatonic positions what I was doing there is a rhythmic grouping of five four five I like to do a lot of things like that because they throw the rhythm off instead of something even like force one two three four one two three four one
  • 06:18: two three four I do a lot of fives and a lot of odd number groupings and it gives a very interesting rhythmic feel to a lot of the phrases I do and the way you have to finger this in order to do it smoothly is starting on the first note of five you start with the second finger and you go and then you start with the second finger again the second finger again now the normal way to do that would be
  • 06:51: just to use the first finger and the third finger the way that you might think that that that would be done but if you did that and you were doing fives you would have to continually flatten the third finger out which would be very awkward and you wouldn't be able to do it very smoothly and and that would be something like this and then you have the flat when it's very difficult this way it's very easy it seems like would be strange but you have to anger your hand a little bit
  • 07:25: angle it in order to be able to get that first the second finger excuse me over there and then once you do that you can practice that in this position but then I would encourage you to try to move that around into the various different pentatonic positions that's using the first four
  • 07:55: that's using five or you can you can switch almost anyone that one slow is this here are some pentatonic sequences using
  • 08:43: different rhythmic groupings that was shot earlier as a part of the first instructional video shoot that I didn't see at all some weeks back now that brings you to a type of pentatonic playing that I want to cover which is a two note per string type of pentatonic playing and it involves some hammer ons and some picking and it involves using different rhythm and groupings again what are your doing rhythmic groupings of four which would be basically that or and then combined with women groupings
  • 09:16: of three which would be like so if you combine those if you do some force and some threes it's real interesting sound like so that was kind of some of the downward one note per string arpeggios mixed in there too and so slow that's like and also you can get into some areas
  • 09:55: where you're doing fives going downward in pentatonix which is another type of passage I like to do I'll do it in a pentatonic slow you're going 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 that's fours and fives mixed together all these kind of displaced rhythmic groupings I tend to because it just is the sound that I hear in my head and so
  • 10:25: Oh and those were some part of some descending pentatonic licks using picking now the basis for those first you need to learn how to do your basic sixes and fives with picking in the pentatonic scale the sixes would be one two three four five six one two three four five six and then you need to work on your fives
  • 10:56: there's two different ways you can do your fives you can go one two three four five one two three four five one two three four five one two three one starting on the same string the next group down one note down the pentatonic scale in each resident group or you can do two down strokes in a row and go one two three four five and then do another down stroke one two three four five one two three four five one two combine two two down strokes in a row which kind of almost speed picking type thing
  • 11:26: okay then an interesting way to mix those up further I incorporate threes and into that a lot so sometimes I'll go one two three one two three four five one two three one two three four five one two three incorporating some of the blue or chromatic notes into there you can do threes and sixes threes and sixes would be one two three one two three four five
  • 11:56: six that was a mixture of three sixes and then the fives so and then those really sound good when you start changing positions and doing different positions of the pentatonic scale like that like I'd like to do a lick now that kind of demonstrates combinations a lot of these
  • 12:26: things and it'll be transcribed in the book so I'm just going to play through maybe a couple different licks that utilize a lot of the things mixed all together you
  • 16:32: now I'm going to show a solo that I did as a part of the in my concert and it's a song called Esperanto that's also on the powers of 10 album on Warner Brothers and I'm going to play it first in time and then I'm going to slow it down to show you why I did some of the things I did and possibly how to finger them here it goes 1 2 3 4 now the chords that that soul is over
  • 17:31: are this starts with a D minor and then E in the first inversion and then a ecord with a c' in the base and then an a chord with the F of the bass and the groove is something like this the first few notes of that I use some
  • 18:05: very subtle bending techniques on I start out slow that goes and what I'm doing there is I play the first note I've been up to it a little bit like a portamento on a keyboard the vibrato bar holding the vibrato bar with these fingers while I'm holding the pick with this finger when I play the second note I've been down slightly on it so these are subtle touches that add to the
  • 18:37: expressiveness in the overall phrasing and then a part of the solo so now the next section is a little harder and it has some rhythms that are kind of bebop influenced and it goes like this I'll slow that down even more one time
  • 19:09: so in tempo that has all kinds of little turns and triplets in it that are reminiscent of some bebop type of
  • 19:39: phrasing it's kind of hard to execute cleanly it goes like this in time so work on that and the little come easy to you over time okay the next section is this and that slow is which is kind of an Augmented pattern all winning scalable so
  • 20:11: and then it continues with a strange lake that utilizes only two fingers and that is a very strange pattern that's just two fingers okay and that slow is even slower yes that may seem like a very strange
  • 20:46: ringing for that but it really works it's the more it's the most natural comfortable way to do something like that that's an example of various ways to use that all over the basically the same scale okay anyway we'll continue the next link is this okay that slow is even slower I would be
  • 21:25: now the next lick is a is a wide interval lick that for me it requires that I've kind of tilt the guitar upwards in order to get that kind of stretch and also it's very important that you bring your thumb I'll probably
  • 21:56: stress this before but you have to bring your thumb around the neck so that the fingers will spread out evenly and I first start by stretching to this position the pattern I'm doing there is kind of a so slow the pattern is light
  • 22:26: variation of two things that pattern I mean also this pattern Swiss okay then I do the same thing but I spread the fingers even further apart and I kind of
  • 22:57: a stranger sounding interval relationship to this the first finger stays in the same position and then second and fourth fingers go up one fret each so now you're right which again is a kind of augmented kind of strange sound Oh same patterns so it starts out here that's very unusual pounding wrong and
  • 23:32: go crazy after you get the basic pattern okay the last leak of the song is a song that on the album is doubled with a whole lot of guitars and harmony and live I do it in harmony with the keyboard player he plays the harmony line but I'm going to show you the primary line that I play and it's kind of a variation on the main theme of the song itself
  • 24:02: do that slow one time for you you again I'm using the bar on this section very subtly as an expressive tool Oh
  • 24:39: just very little pitch bins like that can be very effective or put in the right place and you don't want to overdo it but you know it's just a certain balance you have to try to achieve of playing a note just straight sometimes and then something go by bodily and sometimes bending up to it and bending many notes down is something people don't do a lot people do a lot of bending up I find a down bin can be very expressed and that's something that people don't do a whole lot like even if you're doing a regular rock life like that you can go it makes a lot more expressive when you
  • 25:13: get those little down bins in there like that that slowed be something like this next term we're going to play is called get you back I wanted to get a real pop kind of instrumental feel on this it was initially inspired by Stevie Winwood a little bit and although the version we do live is probably a little more Hard Rock in nature but the album version has kind of a Stevie Winwood
  • 25:44: flavor to it poking junk you okay here's the lick that I just did in
  • 28:15: the song get you back part of the solo so you can check that out and I'll slow it down for you okay broken down and slow let go something like this mmm the chords to the part of the song
  • 29:08: that that solo occurs over a kind of a key center of a goes something like this the song not again we're going to do is a song that really has a lot of input from the great drummer that I've been playing with in this video named Sean Rickman it's really a inspiration to me and we have a real long improvised
  • 29:39: section at the end of this songs real free kind of outside kind of improv and but part of the solo is pretty structured so later on I'm going to show you an excerpt from that and break it apart and show you how to play that you
  • 32:51: you
  • 34:49: you
  • 35:25: we're going to pick up kind of toward
  • 37:13: the end of the night again solar I wanted to show you some of the licks in that and they're kind of representative of the style like to play using wide interval leaps and also using the finger to pick certain notes so we're going to start around the time where does this lid okay so I'm gonna play it fast first so that you'll be able to identify it from from the song and then I'll do it slow for you
  • 37:45: okay let me break it down for you now and show it to you slow I'm also going to count do it in time so you can see how it relates to the time one two three four see the cords that are under that part
  • 38:49: of the solo just so you can know some sort of context is kind of a D major rolling minor okay now I'm going to do the lick fast and in time so you can see the context I'm also going to start it out with just a little piece of the melody that
  • 39:19: happens before the lake so that you'll know you'll have a better time identifying it within the context of the song one two three four one two you now we're going to show a clip of a
  • 39:49: performance from MI of a song called black market it's kind of a weather report kind of a standard fusion tune and me and the drummer Sean Rickman on this tune just go out for a lot of extended kind of freeform har melodic if you are improvisation so hope you enjoy you
  • 41:57: Oh
  • 45:31: you
  • 46:09: you coming up next we asked Shawn about
  • 47:15: recording composing his piano playing and advice he might have for young players well I enjoyed doing the album of powers of ten that's something I always wanted to do because I've also played drums for a long time and bass and keyboards and so on that album I played all the instruments and I wrote all the songs but one and engineered it and produced it because I went to engineering school
  • 47:46: when I was a kid in high school and we had a recording studio in a vocational school in their high school so I went to I went a few years to that and I have my own studio now so I produced the album what I'd like to do is branch off into producing other people's records and engineering other people's records and then also do some more records myself maybe some live performances because there's a certain style of playing I do live that you just it's hard to ever really capture that in the studio but I really love to do some film scoring I'm really in a big film fanatic and study film scoring a lot and some of my
  • 48:18: favorite composers today a Jerry Goldsmith Patrick Doyle Ennio Morricone mark isham all our film score composer James Horner and so I'm going to get into that also I'd love to do I'd love to even though I can't play classical piano in public because I just started too late to do the traditional repertoire I'd really love a chance to do some of my own pieces maybe with a Pops Orchestra sometime or something like that when I write at the keyboard and a lot of the things that you'll hear
  • 48:49: on the album sometimes are the first time it was ever played I use the computer for composing a lot I use the computer just like a digital tape recorder almost and I just sit down and play things and if I get a whole section of a piece on on piano or whatever instrument keyboard instrument I'm playing sound whatever sound I'm triggering from the keyboard rather I will save that and file that away and maybe use that whole thing in a song as part of a song so a lot of times pieces of songs you'll hear are the first time
  • 49:19: it actually it was conceived as the actual first time it was improvised and played and then also as far as in composing orchestral music and everything I just orchestrate and build up the parts and instead of composing say for real orchestra in my head and then making D with kind of a second-rate version of that with samples and stuff I actually compose for the sampled sounds themselves so that if I'm wanting to hear strings I'm composing the part for a sample type string stand I'm not really trying to make it do something it can I love real
  • 49:50: instruments and all that and it's wonderful unfortunately for modern composers today especially if you want to work on a tonal kind of idiom there's just not a lot of outlet to get real symphonies to perform your music so there's the new trend with computers and software and sampling is a great way to compose what you want to compose and and just you know compose around the sounds that are there instead of trying to make them copy something that they can't do exactly well I guess when I was about 17 I got into art tatum I heard a national public radio show one time the featured
  • 50:22: Oscar Peterson and I've been aware of him and I was really really into Oscar Peterson and when he was saying that he you know if you liked him that Tatum was the man that you know even he couldn't touch Tatum then I thought oh I'm I really got to hear this Tatum guy so I checked out the first thing I heard by him I think was the MCA masterpieces album this version of the song Tiger Rag he has which is just this insane thing so so right away I was hooked then I have every tatum album i can find there probably about 90 or so albums and i'm just art tatum maniac and that led me to just appreciate all the other greats in
  • 50:54: jazz now keith jarrett is just you know awesome to me i got all his albums and videos and everything and bill evans all the greats also in memphis there's a great jazz pianist that not many people know about finished newborn junior who was one of the Great's of all time and he died a couple years ago but he lived in Memphis most of his life and yeah I met him and I knew him pretty good and he wanted me to come over to his house but I didn't go in and then he died before I get a chance to really hook up with him much but he was a great guy well then that led to you actually
  • 51:24: playing piano well I got into playing piano because I loved classical music so much and I figured I could spend the time learning to play classical guitar and gut string guitar but I really didn't want to do that because the literature for that instrument wasn't then the appeal to me as much as the literature for the piano because most of literature for classical guitar is Spanish composer's tárrega and sore and cast inaudible to disco and all these things was just some fine music but my temperament was more suited
  • 51:54: to list than Chopin and scriabin and Beethoven Brahms all that and there just wasn't they didn't have those composers didn't write for guitar Paganini were little for guitar but and so uh I just instead of learning classical guitar I just channeled it into learning piano and then I was pretty natural on the piano and I really loved playing piano whole lot and in a way wished I'd started earlier because I'd love to play religion to legitimate classical piano well the direction I want to go in and guitar is just to try to achieve just
  • 52:24: more balance everything is just a striving for balance balancing you know elements and phrasing of speed and tastes and Lear says when all this everything is just a balance you know so a purity and more balance and just a continual refinement of intonation and you know just to try to get better to approach some of my peak some of the people that I'd lie so much like Jascha Heifetz or you know Joseph Hoffman or Allan Holdsworth Pat Metheny you know some of the wonderful people well I think people should just get into music
  • 52:57: more than just specifically guitar when when I started playing guitar I wasn't really worried about getting all that much better anything I just played it because I enjoyed it and I've just played a lot of pop songs a lot of rock songs and and the technique thing just kind of came naturally but I always I went through a period there when I was a kid and we're being kind of really obsessed with the technical kind into things but but now it's just the music that matters to me and I think kids instead of and people starting to play
  • 53:28: the guitar instead of just thinking they have to accumulate all this tremendous stuff and then make music I think it's important to just make music at whatever technical level you're at because I've heard some of the greatest music of with guitars that have no technique and some of the music that has the most technique in the world it doesn't matter there's wonderful music we made at any technical level so people instead of just working on technique should really try to just express themselves in a musical way at whatever level they're at I think people should try to put music in a more
  • 53:58: historical perspective instead of just being into what's now you know it's like planned obsolescence of the music industry where the only hot thing is the thing now I mean there's still recordings you can go back to from the 50s the to 1910 and just have the most valid modern expression so this whole trend in the business toward everything always being geared toward what's new I think that's a little destructive in a way because people don't get the context of things and historical context well I guess I just do a lot of different things and people should try to listen to me and all sorts
  • 54:30: of other things in music and also an art or movies or culture in general I think people should try to see things for what they are and just just listen to something for what it is instead of coming to it with a preconceived set of notions and then judging it against what they are already have in their head they should just clear your head and just listen to something for what it is in and of itself and judge it like that that's about all the time we have now
  • 55:24: for part two hope to see you again on some future instructional releases and again I would urge you to by my powers of 10 album on Warner Brothers if you haven't done so already I'd like to think of you people that have helped me make this possible it's Roger Hutchinson Joe presume it's Steve Scoville Keith Wyatt record one for letting us shoot some of the footage in here Andy John's real Roga and my band Barry Bay's Doug Scarborough and Sean Burton it's gonna be a long list but anyway I'd like to thank these people very much and
  • 55:54: thank you for purchasing the video and hope to see you soon on tour Oh