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Wire Wrap Tutorial SMOKE RING  See details »

 
Video subtitles:
  • 00:00: hi everyone Nicole Hannah here from
  • 00:33: Nicole Hannah jewelry and YouTube's karch yourself today I wanted to share with you a tutorial on my wire woven smoke ring a complete list of materials and tools can be found at the beginning of this video and I'll be sure to list them in the video description below but I wanted to take a moment and talk about the specific tools and why I've chosen them for this project now the shank of the ring detailed in this video is a 14 gauge round wire that will be hammered flat what you'll need to achieve this look is a steel bench block and a rubber base or sandbag I'm
  • 01:04: using a sandbag here to absorb shock and sound now Peppe tools was kind enough to send me a couple other designer bench blocks which come in a lot of different sizes but for this project I really only needed a small block this one is a little larger than 6 by 6 centimeters and I think they have their product size by inches and this one is two and a half it's just large enough for the small amount of hammering that we have to do you know you just want your piece to fit on the surface and give you some room to
  • 01:35: hold on to it the reason I highly recommend a quality block like this is its longevity especially if you're new to hammering the likelihood that at some point you're going to miss your wire and hit your block accidentally is pretty high and I wanted to show you a comparison between damaged until I got this craft store animal and I believe you can get blocks at a craft store two versus using just a quality block and here on this anvil you can see the dings that the hammer can create and these are
  • 02:07: really deep divots which can eventually really impact the smoothness you achieve when he entering hammering future projects now I mean you can keep these damaged blocks or anvils and use them if you want a textured surface of course but but if you want a nice smooth hammered surface this is just it's no good this is it's not going to help you at all and it's just going to end up causing more headaches than it's worth now here you can see on the pepe tools
  • 02:38: block if you can even see it I intentionally tried to create divots using the same hammer the same force of blow and you can see that the divots are so much smaller now I have been working daily with this block for two or three weeks now and I'm pretty rough with it I am NOT gentle when I hammer and I'm not incredibly proficient with hammering I'm still learning and you can see there's
  • 03:10: no markings at all on the surface of this blog which is amazing because I've gone through two of these anvils that I got at Michaels just in the last few months and I don't do much hammering but you'll find that the steel blocks last much much longer and they are in some cases even less expensive than what you're going to find at a critic store
  • 03:41: like this anvil the steel blocks can also be resurfaced I believe with the right tools so I definitely recommend if you're hammering and it'll figure predominantly in your work or even if you're just hammering casually just invest in a good quality bench block they're affordable and it'll make a lot of difference now what you'll also need is a ball peen hammer I like the ball peen because it has a large enough surface here that will work well with the gauge of wire that we're dealing with you just want to be sure
  • 04:12: that the hammer head will cover the metal surface sufficiently to provide that nice flat finish now you can see these rounded edges will also help avoid accidentally coming down at the wire at a bad angle and creating marks on the wire that you're just going to end up having to spend extra time working out either with sanding or further hammering why give yourself the extra work really now you can of course also texture the wire with the ball end if you want that heavily hammered look but for a nice flat ring shank which is what we're
  • 04:44: going for here I go with the flat side of the hammer and it does a great job creating that nice flat smooth finish that we'll be looking for you'll notice this is not a very good quality hammer also an inexpensive craft store find with 40% off coupon it does the job but it's beginning to show we're already with very minimal use so it's another thing that I suggest investing in and getting something that's just a better quality these are not tools you want to keep replacing because the surfaces are dinged and scratched and those marks transfer to
  • 05:15: your metal of course keep them you know for when you want to do something that's a little textured but if you want nice smooth finished look then just invest in a good quality now the hammer also will work hard in your metal so you'll have a nice solid shank that's not going to bend out of shape without pretty excessive force and I like to hold the hammer near the ball into the handle as far away from the neck as possible while still giving me a great solid grip you
  • 05:46: don't want it flying out of your hand when you're swinging and when I swing it's not very heavy or hard at all I let the hammer do most of the work and the repetition is what gets the results that you're looking for in a nice consistent manner you just tap lightly here I'm only holding my hammer three inches or so from the surface of the block and I'm tapping repeatedly and you try to layer your blows that you don't have any noticeable marks on your wire as you work it to that flat surface that you're looking for you'll want to start hammering in the middle of your 14 gauge
  • 06:16: wire and work your way out to each end now the trick to getting those size right for your ring is to grab a scrap piece of wire here I have a piece of 28 gauge or string and you wrap it around your mandrel at the size you want until the ends meet cut off any excess if you have excess but you want those ends to meet and then you're going to lay that wire or string whatever you use you're going to lay it down parallel to your 14
  • 06:47: gauge wire and you want to Center it and you can use a sharpie a marker or something in mark each end and you want to hammer the length of that string or wire and it's a good way to get the size you want without constantly having to stop hammering and check size on the mandrel and then eating your wire back out and continue hammering you just want a hammer to the end of that string or two where you marked it with your marker now you can see here I'm going to go ahead and move
  • 07:17: this out of the way I already have a ring shank hammered I did this off-camera because it's pretty loud and I just wanted to spare you all the noise if possible and I've shaped it around the mandrel I have this aluminum mandrel from Pepe tools and any aluminum or plastic even ring mandrel will be great for sizing and once you've got the size you want you can cut off any excess wire leave about a centimeter on either end just past where the hammering ends and you could trim off the excess preferably with some flush cutters so you don't
  • 07:47: have any jagged wire and steel with then we're going to pull apart the ends I'm just using a pair of needle nose pliers you can use other pliers if you're comfortable with them but I like the needlenose and we're going to create small loops with the one centimeter tails on either end of the brain and you want the loops to roll away from one another and you want them to have an inside diameter of about four millimeters so basically these loops they need to be small but they need to accommodate a few passes of 22 gauge
  • 08:18: wires as well and another thing is to test for the size and shape and fit of this constantly because these loops are pulled apart like this it's going to affect the fit of the ring when you pull it apart like this so you put it back on the ring mandrel and make sure the size that you're going for can be seen
  • 08:48: between the two loops so here I'm going for a size 8 so I want that number to be evenly spaced between these two loops and you want to make sure that the ring is incredibly snug on the mandrel I can't stress that enough because the step nature of the shank were kind of coils it's going to fit differently than a traditional band so it needs to be very very tight on this mandrel you just want to adjust and make sure that those
  • 09:18: loops are nice flat on the surface and that is very very tight on the mandrel sometimes it might even help to pull it off of the mandrel and then tighten it a little bit more now that we've got the shank completed I'm going to move all this stuff out of the way and we'll come back and get started with the weaving used for the face of the ring so just set this aside for now the we're going to do uses three 18 centimeter pieces of 22 gauge round wire this gauge is important the ring is already pretty large and using larger gauges will make the size
  • 09:48: and shape of this ring pretty much unmanageable so definitely use the 22 gauge I'll refer to these as base wires you spread out fan out the ends of these wires and just to give a nice channel for this this smaller 28 gauge wire and I'm going to call this the weaving wire periodically you'll hear that this 28 gauge wire is 240 centimeters I've bent it in half and I'm starting right in the middle of that 2240 centimeter piece of wire and I'm starting on the base wires
  • 10:19: just about a centimeter or so left of center it can be adjusted later so what I'm going to do I've got those base wires layered on top of one another ends even to one another and I'm going to wrap this 28 gauge round wire this weaving wire I'm going to coil it twice around both of those bottom two base wires so the bottom and middle base wire and coiling twice around those two wires I'm going to pass the weaving wire between the bottom and middle wire which
  • 10:50: hopefully you can see here I can't get incredibly close with my camera and now I'm going to coil and I'm going to coil twice around the middle and top wire so the top two wires so basically this is what I call the two two weave it's just the name that I give it for the sake of sparing us some confusion when I refer to weaves if it has another name I don't
  • 11:20: know what it is but I call this the two - weave so doing two coils around the bottom two wires two coils around the top two wires and I'll show you one more time definitely feel free also to you know pause the video rewind as many times as you need to if you're watching the video from a computer or a laptop there's actually something in the lower right hand corner of the screen I believe that
  • 11:52: will allow you to slow down or speed up video so be sure to take advantage of that if I'm going a little too fast so now I'm finishing the last two coils of this rotation I call them rotations when you complete one section of a weave so after these two coils I'm basically going to end up with two rotations of the to two weave now that I've got these two rotations of
  • 12:25: the tutu we've done I'm going to continue along and do a total of 20 rotations I'm going to do that off camera so here we've got the 20 rotations and you can see that it's centered in the wire if you find that yours is not Center you can shimmy it along just kind of use your fingers and and twist it a little bit to get it moving along the base wires but if you've started a centimeter left or Center you should be pretty close does it have to be exact so in this sense
  • 12:57: you've got a shorter tail and on this end um the longer tail and where the longer tail is you want to pass those base wires through the bottom loop what will be the bottom loop of your ring shank and you just want to secure that weave to the ring shape wrap those base wires around the loop and now we're going to kind of create
  • 13:27: this S shape with the weave up to the top loop and this it takes some finagling you know take your time with it play with the shape a little bit you may have to adjust the shank of the ring you may have to pull the loops apart a little bit more make the S shape a little more squat if you do change or alter the shank of the ring at all be
  • 13:57: sure to test it for fit again afterwards so we're going to pass those top bass wire ends through the top loop and curve it around the side of the loop so we've got three ends pointing to the left and three ends on the bottom pointing to the right and four now we're going to work with these right ones but what I like to do usually is pinch very gently because you don't want to mark up your wire but pinch those wires closed around that loop and that just assures that they're laying flat next to one another you're
  • 14:27: not going to have wires bunched up laying against the surface of your finger so just flip it over make sure those wires are nice and flat next to one another and we're going to work with these bottom three wires where the longer tail of that weaving wire is separating them again just like when we started to kind of create nice smooth channels to pass the wire through see how easy it is to pass this wire through thought getting tangled up and now we're going to coil
  • 14:57: three times around this middle base whiner try to get it closed up so you can see and now we're going to coil three times around the two bottom lawyers and this weave I like to call it the three three weave if it has another name I don't know what it is but it's three coils around one wire three coils around two wires always when you're working your
  • 15:28: weaves shimmy it compress it with your fingers so that those rotations like nice and smooth against one another you don't want there to be big gaps between rotations because then that'll throw off the whole size and shape of your project so this completes the rotation of the 3/3 weave we're adding another one here total you want to end up with four and a half rotations of this 3/3 weave you want to have you want to start with
  • 16:01: those one wire coils and you want to end with those coils around one wire and always be sure to compress those rotations in push them in towards one another with your thumb make sure there's no space between all those coils another nice and tight together and then we're just going to create a nice counterclockwise very tight loop with this weave over the front of the loop on the ring shank itself and I like to use my finger to guide the shape while I hold the ends of
  • 16:32: those wires with the rest of my fingers in my hand but just as you need to just to get it positioned right okay now that we have these this three three we've in position we're going to curve this remaining base wire on this end here in a clockwise loop inside the curve of that three three weave you really just want to take your time reposition as necessary and get those wires lined up parallel to one another as good as possible run them through your finger
  • 17:03: kind of smooth out any little ripples or kinks that that occur on the wire I'm spreading them out again to allow for a good channel to pass that weaving wire through here you can see I'm even adjusting with my pliers to get it positioned perfectly as well and now on these three wires I'm going to go ahead and complete a few more rotations of the two the two to weave that we did in that original S shape and because the wire is positioned with that 3/3 weave we're
  • 17:38: going to begin the first two coils on the top two wires last time we did it on the bottom two so when we start this weave we want to kind of keep it a good flow from the previous wave so you start using the same wires so that was the two coils around the top two wires and then we'll do the two coils around the bottom two wires and you can see I'm stopping and using my fingernail to push in the
  • 18:08: weave as I work because when they're layered like this it's kind of hard to get those rotations compressed and flush against one another so now we've done 20 rotations of this two to weave and we're just going to start to curve it to mimic that original weave that we did always stop and test for fit I like to make sure that that first weaves it's flush against the face of the finger so after
  • 18:38: each weave you you really just want to take the time to make sure that the ring still fits the way you want it to so I'm curving this inside or against the the line of that original S shape and I'm you know play around and adjust sometimes you may have to pull those loops apart from one another a little bit just adjust because you want those two weaves laid next to each other not really on top of each other or not with
  • 19:09: a big gap in between them so if there's a gap you really just want to play with it it just looks better when those weaves are sitting side-by-side now we're going to pass the ends of these this weave through that loop and you can see this is the reason we needed a loop that is a little larger because it needs to be able to accommodate all these wires and it takes even a little bit for me to finagle it through because my loop is even a little too small
  • 19:40: just try to get it through anyway you can and I've bent it around the back of the Lube to kind of secure that weave into place and just kind of move my wires around make sure I'm not getting tangled up in wire ends if you flip it over you can see the tails of those wires I'm going to trim those off you want to leave enough when you're trimming like this you want to leave enough that those ends of the base wires can really firmly grip on to whatever it's wrapped around so I'm using my pliers to kind of continue to curl these
  • 20:11: these wires around the loop you just want to make sure if you run your finger along the back you can't feel any of those trimmed ends so now we're going to start working with the last three wire ends and you see we've got two pieces of 28 gauge weaving wire coming out from here you want to use the longest of the
  • 20:42: two one is going to be just slightly longer than the other one so use the longer one for this next 3/3 weave that we're going to do on the bottom two wires just like when we did the three three weave on the other side so we're going to coil three times around that middle base wire and then we're going to coil three times around both those wires and that's one of your rotations of the
  • 21:16: 3/3 weave and you want to carry these rotations all the way down you want to do 20 and a half rotations beginning and ending this weave with the one wire coils and always stop take a minute to compress that weave make sure those rotations are nice and flush against one another so now we're going to curve this 3-3 weave into a clockwise loop and you want that that we've sort of covering
  • 21:46: the loop created with the ring shank you know you like to use my thumb to kind of help position the curves because you want this 3-3 weave to also mimic that very first S shape that we did with the 2 to weave and you want this weave to curve all the way around where that first 3/3 weave is and always take time to stop before you secure any wire ends
  • 22:18: you want to make sure that your weaves sit nice and they're parallel to one another right next to each other before you trim any wires you see this little loop this bear loop that we created inside the curve of that previous 3 3 weave shimmy some pliers in there make some room and now we're going to trim off the excess weaving wire here you can just toss that and we're going to run these ends of these two wires here in between that little space we created and
  • 22:48: we're going to wrap those wire ends around that little loop I'm just using my pliers to help there's not much wire length to grip on to so use your pliers where your fingers just don't have the leverage necessary so I'm kind of wiggling it and pulling it into place and then I'm just going to wrap those ends around that loop and trim off whatever is excess before you trim though always stop Regas at the front of
  • 23:20: the piece make sure the curves and everything are laying where inhale you want them to lay before you finalize anything and trim and once you trim these ends off just take your pliers and pinch them closed around that loop really make sure that they're nice and secure so now we're just left with this last wire this last base wire and the last tale of the weaving wire and we're just going to coil around that remaining base wire and
  • 23:50: we're going to just coil as close to the end as you want you can always uncoil if you have too many and you can always add coils if you don't have enough so don't don't feel like you have to commit to a certain length that's really just going to depend on how far apart exactly your loops are on the shank so I've boiled quite a bit here and I'm curving it curving this coiled wire inside that
  • 24:20: little three three we look we've loop using my thumb's as leverage to help guide that the curves of the the wire and you want the end of those coils to reach that loop where we secure the weave before previously and as long as you have enough coils to reach that point you can trim off your excess weaving wire and discard that but it you know you have a little extra there if you need to add a little a few more coils so I'm just going to shimmy this
  • 24:51: in in that little space created by that loop next to the ends of the three three weave and when I pull through before I make any final commitments I'm just going to double check the flow of the weaves in the coil on the front and as long as I like that flow as long as I like the position of things then I can go ahead and wrap this wire around pinch
  • 25:22: off the access here with the wire cutters and pinch that into closed I'm pulling it close to me so I can see when I'm what I'm pinching closed here just use those pliers and kind of roll it closed around that loop and you're done and all you have to do now if you want you can leave it nice and bright like this or you can give it a little liver of sulfur bath and give it a bit of a patina and you can also try it on
  • 25:52: put it on the mandrel make sure it sits right on the mandrel here in this case I could feel those loops kind of pressing against my finger a little bit so I'm pulling them away from what would be the surface of the finger and now it fits perfect and comfortable and I couldn't wear it all day give it a little patina and you're all finished I want to thank you for watching this tutorial and if
  • 26:27: you have any questions definitely leave them in the comments below I'll see you again next time